Q&A: Need someone who has been on an Alaska cruise/tour recently to advise on mosquito problems and tours?

Question by vlanderbab: Need someone who has been on an Alaska cruise/tour recently to advise on mosquito problems and tours?
What works for mosquitos? Do they get on the ship in ports? Are there tour options in Fairbanks,Denali and the ports of Haines, Juneau and Ketchican that are less expensive than the ones offered by the cruise line?

Best answer:

Answer by Time travler
Anything with DEET works great. I just used Off with no problems, but on my second cruise to Alaska this summer, I am considering one of the clip on things with a fan from Off. It is something new and would be nice to not have to put anything directly on your skin. I have never seen them get on the ship, but I’m sure it is possible. My favorite tour in Denali was the Homestead Husky tour that took us to Jeff Kings facility(4 time winner of the Ididerod). He is wonderful and treats you like a best friend. Oh, be sure to go to the Red Dog saloon in Juneau too.

What do you think? Answer below!

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3 Responses to Q&A: Need someone who has been on an Alaska cruise/tour recently to advise on mosquito problems and tours?

  1. sally b says:

    Yes the ship tours are expensive. You can safely book them online for much less. Remember, lots of people visit other than those on a cruise. That is why they have hotels. Didn’t have a problem with mosquitoes.

  2. littlemissknowitall says:

    You will have very little problem with mosquitoes. They won’t be on the ship. They aren’t anywhere that it is windy or rainy or above 70 degrees outdoors. There are very few in cities, because there is no standing water for them to breed in. The only place you may see them is if you are near a swamp, lake, or other damp place, or out at night in a woodsy spot. If you are allergic to mosquitoes, Cutter’s insect repellent works well. In Alaska, we put it on our clothing, rather than on our skin. We cover our exposed skin with hats, thin gloves, long sleeves, etc. For some reason, mosquitoes are attracted to the color blue.
    In Fairbanks, the Riverboat Discovery, University of Alaska Museum, Little Eldorado Gold Mine, Tales of The Trail with Mary Shields ( I really like this one), and the Aurora presentation at the Ice Museum are some attractions. I would also recommend the Morris Thompson Visitor’s Center downtown on the Chena River (cheap or free). In Denali, if you make arrangements ahead of time you can take the public park bus tour. The bus is less comfortable, but it goes farther into the park and is reasonably priced. You’ll need to bring your own snacks. It’s how non-tour people see the park. You can find info. on the park web site. Haines has the world’s only Hammer Museum and nice beaches. Sometimes it’s just nice to walk around, sit in a coffee shop and talk to locals, etc. If you can take advantage of any trip to Klukwan, do it. In Juneau, some people just rent a taxi and go driving around, to the Mendenhall Glacier, the Alaska State Museum, past the Governor’s Mansion and the state capitol. The downtown area is confined enough that if you just want to walk around, you can see the museum, capitol, shops and ride the tram up Mt. Roberts all on foot, if you are a walker. There are even some hiking trails that take off from downtown, like Basin Road and the Mt. Roberts trail. For shopping, I like Raven’s Journey for authentic native art at the downhill end of the main street the cruise ships dock on , Franklin St. and the antiquarian and used book and map store, Observatory Books, a few blocks up the street, about two blocks past the Baranof Hotel.
    In Ketchikan, try to see the Totem Heritage Center and/or get out to Saxman. A walk through the boat harbor is fun, too. Most people also like to see Creek Street, along Ketchikan Creek, and to shop for all the original art that is for sale in Ketchikan.
    Depending on the time of year that you travel, Alaska has many Fairs and festivals in the summer. So keep an eye on event calendars and you may be able to watch a local parade. The fish will be running in the fall, and you may be able to see some come upstream to spawn, or to watch the eagles fishing. If you are out riding around in the early morning before 8 or after 9 p.m. watch for moose in the fields and ponds.
    It’s fun to meet the locals. Attending events is one way to do that. In Alaska, you can strike up a conversation with people. Most Alaskans are super friendly, so feel free to ask people for advice and directions. Like anywhere, you may run into someone who has no personality, so if that happens, just ask someone else.
    Here are some questions NOT to ask 8>):
    Do you take American money here? (we are proud to be the 49th state and feel very much part of the USA)
    Do you live in igloos? (igloos are temporary hunting shelters)
    Where can I see an Eskimo? ( Inupiaq and Yup’ik people live in communities all over our state and are not a tourist attraction. If people want to learn more about their cultures, the museums and the Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage are a good place to go)
    In Juneau, by the ocean, “what is the elevation here?” (The elevation is sea level.)
    I’m sure that you would not ask anything so crazy, but believe it or not, people ask these questions all the time.

    Have a great trip! Bring your camera!!!

  3. michael r says:

    We just got back july 12th and the mosquitos weren’t too bad but bring something as they’re huge. The weather has been dry but they are out especially if you go on certain tours.